seller behavior

No More Mr Nice Guy: Tougher Negotiators Make Better Deals
JEONG, Martha | MINSON, Julia | YEOMANS, Michael | GINO, Francesca

Distributive bargaining is innately competitive: one party cannot benefit without the other’s losing out. To secure the best deals, good negotiation skills are crucial. Negotiators usually opt for one of two opposing communi ...

Optimal Pricing and Sequential Consumption
ZHOU, Junjie | CHEN, Ying-Ju

Social interactions play a crucial role in the markets of social goods. This paper examines the optimal selling scheme when products show such social good feature. This paper examines a monopoly firm model adopting sequential lau ...

“Bang bang”: an optimal sales strategy for perishable goods
HU, Peng | SHUM, Stephen | YU, Man

Shopkeepers and store managers should base decisions on whether to discount or destroy leftover perishable goods on consumer behavior, an innovative new study has found. While marking down prices can provide welcome revenue for fo ...

“Does Being Nice Help in Negotiation?”

The old adage, “You can catch more flies with honey than vinegar,” suggests that it is easier to get what we want by being nice and flattering to others, than it is to be tough and demanding.  We explored whether ...

The Perils of too much Information: An Agricultural Framework
CHEN, Ying-Ju | HE, Qiao-Chu | SHEN, Zuo-Jun Max

Agriculture—the science of cultivating soil, growing crops, and raising livestock—is the primary economic sector of many developing economies throughout the world. Within this context, farmer producer organisations (FP ...

How to Win Friends and Influence People

Marketers and other agents use a variety of tactics to influence us. One commonly-used persuasion tactic is flattery. But does flattery really work, or do we see right through it? Professor Jaideep Sengupta draws on his extensive ...

Behavioral Finance

Standard models of financial markets assume people behave rationally. Behavioral finance builds on this foundation by taking insights from cognitive psychology to explain puzzling observations in asset prices that cannot be explai ...