Directory

Prof. T. Bradford BITTERLY

Prof. T. Bradford BITTERLY

Assistant Professor

bbitterly@ust.hk

Academic Qualifications

  • Ph.D. The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, Operations, Information and Decisions
  • B.A. University of Notre Dame, Psychology, Magna cum laude

ACADEMIC AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

  • The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Department of Management, Assistant Professor, 2020 - present.

  • The Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, 2018 - 2020.


PUBLICATIONS

Refereed Journal Publications (Chronological, alphabetical)

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2020. The economic and interpersonal consequences of deflecting direct questions. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 118: 945-990.

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2019. The impression management benefits of humorous self-disclosures: How humor influences perceptions of veracity. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 151: 73-89.

  • Levine, E.E., Bitterly, T.B., Cohen, T.R., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2018. Who is trustworthy? Predicting trustworthy intentions and behavior. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 115: 468-494.

  • Bitterly, T.B., Brooks, A.W., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2017. Risky business: When humor increases and decreases status. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 112: 431-455.

Book Chapters

  • Bitterly, T.B., Mislavsky, R., Dai, H., & Milkman, K.L. 2015. Dueling with desire: A synthesis of past research on want/should conflict. In W. Hoffman and L. Nordgren (Eds.), The Psychology of Desire. New York, NY: The Guildford Press, pp. 244-264.

Other publications

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Brooks, A.W. 2020. Sarcasm, self-deprecation, and inside jokes: A user’s guide to humor at work, Harvard Business Review, 98(4): 96-103.

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2019, Nov 18. How to deflect difficult questions in an interview or negotiation. Harvard Business Review.

  • Brooks, A.W., Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2017, Feb 27. Why it pays off to be funny at work—usually. Wall Street Journal.


SELECTED RECENT CONFERENCE PRESENTATIONS

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2019. The impression management benefits of humorous self- disclosures: How humor influences perceptions of veracity. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.

  • Bitterly, T.B., Kang, P., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2019. The valence of power. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Boston, MA.

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2019. The economic and interpersonal consequences of deflecting direct questions. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Boston, MA; and the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, Dublin.

  • Bitterly, T.B. 2019. How power influences the use of humor. Presented at International Association for Conflict Management Conference, Dublin.

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2019. The impression management benefits of humorous self-disclosure. Presented at the Society for Consumer Psychology Conference, Savannah, GA.

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2018. The economic and interpersonal consequences of deflecting direct questions. Presented at the Society of Judgment and Decision Making Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA; the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.; International Association for Conflict Management Conference, Philadelphia.; and Behavioral Decision Research in Management Conference, Boston, MA.

  • Bitterly, T.B. 2018. Humor and hierarchy. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2018. You’re getting warmer: The impression management benefits of humorous self-disclosure. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.; and the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, Philadelphia.

  • Bitterly, T.B. 2018. Shock and ha! The relationship between power and humor. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Chicago, IL.; and the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, Philadelphia.

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2017. Can we deflect direct questions? What good is that? Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.

  • Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2017. You’re getting warmer: The impression management benefits of humorous self-disclosure. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Atlanta, GA.; and the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, Berlin.

  • Levine, E.E., Bitterly, T.B., Cohen, T.R., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2017. Who is trustworthy? Predicting trustworthy intentions and behavior. Presented at the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, Berlin.

  • Bitterly, T.B., Brooks, A.W., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2016. Risky business: When humor increases and decreases status. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Anaheim, CA.

  • Bitterly, T.B., Brooks, A.W., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2016. That’s what she said: When humor attempts increase and decrease status. Presented at the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, New York City.

  • Bitterly, T.B., Brooks, A.W., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2015. Risky business: When humor increases and decreases status. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Vancouver, Canada.

  • Levine, E.E., Bitterly, T.B., Cohen, T.R., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2015. Trust the guilty: Anticipated guilt increases trustworthiness. Presented at the Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Vancouver, Canada.

  • Levine, E.E., Bitterly, T.B., & Schweitzer, M.E. 2015. Trust the guilty! Guilt-prone individuals are more trustworthy. Presented at the International Association for Conflict Management Conference, Leiden.


REVIEW ACTIVITIES

  • Ad Hoc reviewer:

    • Journal of Experimental Social Psychology

    • Management Science

    • Organization Science

    • Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes

    • Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin


RESEARCH INTERESTS

  • Negotiation

  • Power and Status

  • Trust

  • Communication